Uncomplicated, in Afghanistan — Part 1

We would like to thank Kathy Kelly, Chicago based humanitarian worker and co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence, for joining EMERGENCY USA as a guest blog author again. She previously contributed the piece “From Chicago to Kabul.”

This is the first of a three part series in which Kelly examines NATO’s role in the Afghanistan conflict and the example set by EMERGENCY hospitals in AfghanistanThis article first appeared on the Telesur English website. By sharing her personal view of EMERGENCY’s impact in Afghanistan, Kelly joins Khaled Hosseini and many other EMERGENCY USA supporters who believe that high quality healthcare is a basic human right.

Check back Friday for part 2.


On November 7, 2014, while visiting Kabul, The Secretary General of NATO, Jens Stoltenberg, noted that NATO will soon launch a new chapter, a new non-combat mission in Afghanistan. But it’s difficult to spot new methods as NATO commits itself to sustaining combat on the part of Afghan forces.

Stoltenberg commended NATO Allies and partner nations from across the world, in an October 29th speech, in Brussels, declaring that for over a decade, they “stood shoulder to shoulder with Afghanistan.” According to Stoltenberg, “this international effort has contributed to a better future for Afghan men, women and children.” Rhetoric from NATO and the Pentagon regularly claims that Afghans have benefited from the past 13 years of U.S./NATO warfare, but reports from other agencies complicate these claims.
UNAMA, the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, found that in the first six months of 2014, combat among the warring parties surpassed improvised explosive devices (IEDs) as the leading cause of conflict-related death and injury to Afghan civilians.

Afghanistan.

EMERGENCY‘s Lashkar-Gah Surgical Center for War VIctims

This “disturbing upward spiral” has meant the number of children and other vulnerable Afghans killed and wounded since the beginning of the year rose dramatically and “is proving to be devastating.”

Stoltenberg’s assurance of NATO’s positive contribution to civilian welfare in Afghanistan is also undermined by a recently issued Amnesty International report examining NATO/ISAF operations. These operations include air strikes, drone attacks and night raids, all of which have caused civilian deaths and also involved torture, disappearances, and cover-ups. The report, entitled “Left in the Dark,” gives ten chilling and horrific case studies occurring between 2009- 2013. Amnesty International states that two of the case studies “involve abundant and compelling evidence of war crimes.”


To learn more about EMERGENCY’s programs in Afghanistan, click here. If you would like to join Kathy Kelly in supporting Afghan civilian victims of war, please click here to donate now

One thought on “Uncomplicated, in Afghanistan — Part 1

  1. Pingback: Upcoming Kathy Kelly Events in the Bay Area | EMERGENCY USA

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